How To Use The Word “Condolence”

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Loosing someone you love is really painful. People who express their sympathy at someone’s lost usually use the term “condolence” which I also heard from my friends and relatives after loosing my dad. This word is very common though we are not that sure of the real meaning or the right usage of this word. All we know is that this word should be uttered or used to show how sorry we are for someone whose family member is dead.

Out of curiosity, searching the net for the real meaning of the word and the correct usage as well made me learn something new. I was a bit surprised to found out that I grew up hearing and using the word in the wrong way.

C.O.N.D.O.L.E.N.C.E. is a NOUN (often plural): expression of sympathy with another in sorrow or grief

So how do we use the word “condolence” correctly to express our sympathy? Here are a some examples:

1. “You and your family will be in my prayers. I am sorry to hear about your loss, please accept my condolences to  your family.”

2. “Please accept our sincerest condolences in this time of sorrow.”

3. “I am sorry for your loss. Please accept our condolences.”

4. “We wish to express our deepest sympathy during this time of loss for your family.”

On the other hand, being with that person or family who lost someone they love and showing your sympathy might be enough for them. They would not mind if you cannot think of words to express how you feel. What they only need to know is you are there for them. =) A simple hug or tap to their shoulders would mean a lot.

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